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Organic vs non organic: what’s in our non organic produce?

We’ve always known that organic farming offers produce far healthier than non organic foods. But new research by Newcastle University, and published in the British Journal of Nutrition, has highlighted significant differences between organic and non-organic farming.

The research shows that the cocktail of chemicals in non organic foods, sold in our supermarkets has risen significantly.

Here’s what the research found:

  • 48% lower concentrations of the toxic heavy metal cadmium in organic crops

  • The frequency of detectable pesticide residues is four times higher in non-organic crops

  • That non-organic fruit had the highest pesticide frequency (75%), compared to non-organic vegetables (32%) and non-organic crop based processed foods (45%)

  • That by contrast, pesticide residues were found in 10% of organic crop samples.

The Soil Association says that people don’t realise that non organic farming routinely uses 320 pesticides, which present in the non organic produce we buy.  I did not know it was that much.

Apparently, the biggest rise in chemicals used has been on onions and leeks, from 1.8 in 1966 to 32.6 in 2015.

My Grampie always told me stories of how many chemicals his farmer friends used on their non organic farms. Growing up, we always ate foods from Grampie’s little farm and trusted that it was safe.

The Soil Association says the only way to eat safe is to eat organic.

But with increasing food prices who can afford to buy only organic? Case in point: A 206g of kale from a well known supermarket is £1.00, whereas a 200g packet of organic kale from the same supermarket is £1.50.

Eating fresh fruit and vegetables instead of processed foods has been key in me turning my health around, and reclaiming some of my life from fibromyalgia.

But this news makes me wonder, is it even worth eating fresh if it’s not organic? Am I fixing one problem, only to cause another?

What do you think?

Gentle hugs 🙂 x

Lou Liebau

potofcallaloo

Alisha Nurse is a curry-loving writer & comms professional who holds a Master of Arts Degree in Journalism (International) from the University of Westminster, London.
Get in touch with any feedback or questions via the contact form in the ‘About’ section.

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